How to investigate corruption in the courts 2

Just how prevalent is corruption in the courts? The closest approximation we can get is from a 2007 global survey by Transparency International. It found that 20% of African respondents who had interacted with the judiciary the previous year said they paid a bribe. For Latin America, the figure was 18%, and Asia, 15%.

These are rough estimates, but surveys are a safe and anonymous way to get revealing information about bribery in the judiciary. After all, few people openly admit to bribing judges. (A recent exception was Pakistan’s top real-estate developer, Malik Riaz Hussein. This past week, he provided journalists with evidence that, in order to curry favor with the Supreme Court, he had paid for lavish London vacations taken by the son of Chief Justice Iftikhar Muhammad Chaudhry. Hussein’s admission raised eyebrows in Pakistan: the charges, some journalists say, are part of a plot to discredit the independent-minded chief magistrate.)

Unlike the statements of self-confessed bribers, surveys have been less contentious. In Russia, the independent INDEM Foundation conducts annual surveys of “everyday corruption.” The 2010 survey found that Russians were most likely to pay small bribes to traffic policemen and to facilitate entry in publicly funded kindergartens and colleges. Bribes paid to courthouses were lower down the list, with the average bribe at less than $400. Read the rest of this entry »

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